Meet the Coyotes

The coyote, like the wolf, are members of the family Canidae and are cousins to the domesticated dog. Typically solitary, coyotes are naturally shy and are opportunistic hunters.

A coyote can be identified by its sharp pointed ears that never droop, a sharp pointed nose, and long bushy tail.

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Meet Togiak

Togiak came from a litter that was living in a den in the flight path at the military base in Anchorage, Alaska.

When the United State Department of Agriculture went to relocate the den, Togiak was left behind by his family and was transferred to the Alaska Wildlife Conservation Center in 2016. Togiak was named after the Togiak National Wildlife Refuge by the Ahklun Mountains in southwest Alaska.

COYOTES:

Coyotes weigh between 22 to 35 pounds with males weighing more than females. Coyotes breed between January and March, giving birth in the spring to an average of five to seven blind pups. Coyotes are often referred to as the “song dog” and are the most vocal of the wild canids. Coyotes are carnivores with a varied diet of snowshoe hares, moose, rodents, caribou, marmots, ground squirrels, muskrats, fish, and insects.

Meet Aurora

Aurora has a similar story to Togiak; she was discovered on the runway of the military base, her mother and littermates nowhere to be found.

She was relocated to AWCC in 2017. Aurora was named after the northern lights, known as the Aurora Borealis. Aurora is smaller in size and has distinguished colored markings on her body.

COYOTES:

Coyotes weigh between 22 to 35 pounds with males weighing more than females. Coyotes breed between January and March, giving birth in the spring to an average of five to seven blind pups. Coyotes are often referred to as the “song dog” and are the most vocal of the wild canids. Coyotes are carnivores with a varied diet of snowshoe hares, moose, rodents, caribou, marmots, ground squirrels, muskrats, fish, and insects.

Listen to the Coyotes Audio Guide

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NEW Animal Clinic & Housing building
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"These additions and expansions will make it possible for us to provide the best care for resident animals and allow us to expand opportunities to rescue, care for, and potentially release injured and orphaned animals back into the wild."  Dr. Oakley, AWCC Head Veterinarian